Boudoir Photography = a step back from feminism?

Oh boy. Sounds like it's gonna be a deep topic. Don't leave yet!

Fanny and I had an impromptu interview with Radio Canada Manitoba a couple of weeks ago concerning boudoir photography. An expert was brought on board to discuss the impact on publishing your boudoir photos online. She did bring up an interesting point of view we never really thought of.

If you'd like to watch the interview and read the article (in French), it's here.

 
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A quick reminder.

While more men and couples are inquiring about boudoir sessions, our clientele is mostly women as you can imagine. No secret here. We won't go over in details why you should do a boudoir session (because we did it here) but to be honest with you, we think that the best reason to do it is because you want to treat and/or challenge yourself. It is a full experience that everyone should try at some point.

Posting sexy photos of yourself online = seeking attention?

During this interview, we were asked why our models were sharing their photos online. Our main argument is that, you Scandals post them because you are proud of them, and proud of yourself. The second argument is that nowadays, while we may not like to admit it openly, we do like online validation. It feels nice to get positive comments from friends, family and sometimes strangers. Every time one of our clients has posted her pictures from her session on social media, we have never seen a negative comment. It is actually quite the opposite, people are supporting the movement, which makes us obviously very happy.

The point of view expressed by the sociologist in this article was pretty concerning. From what we understood, she thinks the fact that more women want to show themselves in lingerie is risky and is not a way to claim our feminism. She adds:

"Why should every woman show themselves? I see it at a regressive phenomenon."

Not Ashamed.

By definition, feminism is wanting to get the same rights as men, period. I do think that dragging feminism and politics in this interview didn't make much sense with boudoir to begin with. I am assuming the idea behind it was that, as women, we cannot expect to be taken as seriously if we were to post sexy pictures of ourselves online.

Boudoir photography is getting more and more popular for one reason: women (and men!) are finally saying "screw it" to inaccessible beauty standards and are encouraging self love and acceptance. Boudoir is a way to celebrate yourself, why would you hide it? Don't get us wrong, you have every right to keep your photos private. But you also have the right to share them without losing points in the feminism column.

Less professional because of boudoir?

If you have been following us for a little while, you must have seen that we are using ourselves for our advertising. You have seen us in lingerie, and even tasteful nudity. Does that make us look less professional to you? Do you even remember it when you see us face to face? Every time we have met someone who knows us through Scandaleuse, we only got positive and exciting feedback on our movement.

 One of our many example of our advertising with... ourselves.

One of our many example of our advertising with... ourselves.

The other photographer Sarah says at the end of the video that she admires women who share their photos online and that it will become more and more normal, so we won't have to worry about we are seen by others. We thank her for that.

You are not less professional because of your boudoir photos. It has absolutely nothing to do with your work performance, the way you interact with people, or whether you like broccoli or not. If anything, you were just brave enough to openly say you are proud of yourself.

If social media can get more positive messages and encouragement, I don't know about you but I am down. As long as we keep those cute cat videos too.

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